How your brain sees your body: Meet the cortical homunculus | Āgenskalna privātklīnika

SOURCE: http://www.similia.lv/interesting/how-your-brain-sees-your-body/?lang=en

"We all know what bodies look like from the outside. This cortical homunculus is how your brain sees your body from the inside.

In the 1930s, Wilder Penfield performed surgeries on patients with epilepsy. While he had a live brain on the table, he figured he might as well poke around a bit. The doctor gathered data, finding out which parts of the cerebral cortex control which voluntary body functions and feeling. What he discovered was a vastly distorted view of the human body: the cortical homunculus."

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
244 Hits
0 Comments

Neurons and amyloid plaque

Neurons and amyloid plaque

.

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
230 Hits
0 Comments

The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

SOURCE: https://www.damninteresting.com/the-baader-meinhof-phenomenon/

" Our brains are fantastic pattern recognition engines, a characteristic which is highly useful for learning, but it does cause the brain to lend excessive importance to unremarkable events. Considering how many words, names, and ideas a person is exposed to in any given day, it is unsurprising that we sometimes encounter the same information again within a short time. When that occasional intersection occurs, the brain promotes the information because the two instances make up the beginnings of a sequence. What we fail to notice is the hundreds or thousands of pieces of information which aren’t repeated, because they do not conform to an interesting pattern. "

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
240 Hits
0 Comments

TeleVirus

Rate this blog entry:
264 Hits
0 Comments

Virus

"Virus" circa 2002 : Inspired by a paragraph I read in an old Time Life book (The Cell) explaining the basic attack mechanism of a virus. The quote below is not the original text that inspired the animation but the essence of it is close enough:

"Viruses that attack bacteria were named 'bacteriophages'. The term phage originates from Greek phagein, which translates as 'to eat'. The phage infection cycle seems to be simple but extremely efficient: a single phage injects its genome into a bacterial cell, switching the cells' programme in its favour so the host cell will eventually die and release about 100 new phage particles.1 "

1 source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2670874/

Rate this blog entry:
290 Hits
0 Comments

reptilian-lizard brain emotions

SOURCE: http://www.myshrink.com/counseling-theory.php?t_id=86

The reptilian brain controls much more of our behavior than we realize. Use the power of the reptilian brain to optimize your counseling. "The reptilian-lizard brain is an ancient beast. It was developed over 100 million years ago. The higher brain or the neocortex came along a mere 40,000 years ago. So, when the reptilian brain is on alert, it's pretty hard for a youngster like our neocortex to tell a 100 million year old brain to behave!2"

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
249 Hits
0 Comments

Triune brain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SOURCE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triune_brain

"The triune brain consists of the reptilian complex, the paleomammalian complex (limbic system), and the neomammalian complex (neocortex), viewed as structures sequentially added to the forebrain in the course of evolution. However, this hypothesis is no longer espoused by the majority of comparative neuroscientists in the post-2000 era."

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
288 Hits
0 Comments

How to By-Pass Your Reptilian Brain and Restore Your Creative Power  Collective Evolution

SOURCE: http://www.collective-evolution.com/2013/06/16/how-to-by-pass-your-reptilian-brain-and-restore-your-creative-power/

"A few things to consider: the vast majority of advertising campaigns, media content and political propaganda these days are targeting the reptilian response section of the brain in the masses, hence creating a de-evolution of a collectively manifested reality... It goes a little something like this. (*Hypothetical situation*) You are walking through the mall and a billboard with a sexually attractive model promoting whatever product ‘catches’ (*triggers*) your attention, and it’s on ‘sale!’ You instantly feel distracted, compelled to break stride, walk in and consider purchasing this product. That is how that scenario usually goes…"

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
256 Hits
0 Comments

Missing link found between brain, immune system; major disease implications -- ScienceDaily

SOURCE: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150601122445.htm

In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. The discovery could have profound implications for diseases from autism to Alzheimer's to multiple sclerosis.

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
288 Hits
0 Comments

How Your Brain Works And How To Train It

SOURCE: http://www.lifehack.org/288159/infographic-tell-you-how-your-brain-works-and-how-train

An infographic to explain the function of the brain and how you can manipulate it to your advantage. For a long time our brains have always been thought of as machines capable of amazing feats but only as strong as the hardware given. Recent studies, however, have suggested that our brains are more like plastic, able to be shaped, formed and molded over time by giving direct attention and focus to learning new things.

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
286 Hits
0 Comments

BBC - Future - The complex circumstances that defined your gender

SOURCE: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20160620-the-complex-circumstances-that-defined-your-gender

Scientists are only just getting to grips with the complicated interplay of genes, hormones and life experience that come to shape our identity.

Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
291 Hits
0 Comments

"Limbic. Neocortex. The reptilian brain, the oldest of the three, controls the body's vital functions such as heart rate, breathing, body temperature and balance. Our reptilian brain includes the main structures found in a reptile's brain: the brainstem and the cerebellum."

thebrain.mcgill.ca

Rate this blog entry:
230 Hits
0 Comments

"Brain and mind are not the same. Your brain is part of the visible, tangible world of the body. Your mind is part of the invisible, transcendent world of thought, feeling, attitude, belief and imagination. The brain is the physical organ most associated with mind and consciousness, but the mind is not confined to the brain. The intelligence of your mind permeates every cell of your body, not just brain cells. Your mind has tremendous power over all bodily systems."

Dr. William B. Salt, MD

Rate this blog entry:
183 Hits
0 Comments

ReptileMind.com 2016

ReptileMind.com 2016

I am thrilled to announce the launch of ReptileMind.com 2016! Reptilemind is the creative portfolio of Christopher Hayes, visual artist.

ReptileMind was officially launched as a dot com on April 29th 2003 but it's origins stretch back to somewhere in mid 1998 (this being roughly it's tenth edition). The site's early years were spent as a few pages of HTML stashed away in hidden directories on whatever server I could get inconspicuous access to. Once ISP's began offering modest bits of server space to their subscribers for "Personal Pages" it moved up a few directories and became a legitimate albeit fourth class citizen on my (eek!) AOL account. In retrospect it is a miracle that it's content escaped the notice of AOL's TOS police but thankfully it survived.

...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
763 Hits
0 Comments

A Fragementary Bio

I grew up in the pre-personal computer age. Pong, Pac Man, Atari and an occasional brief encounter with the commodore 64 was as close as I came to computer technology as a kid. By the time I entered college, the Mac Plus had hit the market and the school opened its first computer center. Though a marvel at the time, the Mac Plus for me was essentially a glorified type writer, a type writer which I had to schedule time in upwards of a week in advance in order to use for writing my term papers. That was OK though, lack of access was no big deal. I was majoring in film and writing term papers was just about all the use I had for a computer back then.

It wasn’t until somewhere around 1993-1994 that I met the internet and it was only then that my opinions about the computer began to change. My discovery of the internet heralded the beginning of what would become a career in web design and video motion graphics. In 1995 I abandoned my dream of becoming a fine artist in exchange for a career in digital media (those who love me should have shot me, but who could have known). I set about learning HTML, Cold Fusion and finally ASP.

...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
416 Hits
0 Comments